What, exactly, is a photo?

Steamboat Slough at sunset, near Isleton, Sacramento County, California

This question comes up every so often in the photo community.  You would think it’s an obvious answer, right?  What is a photo?  Not what makes a good photo, just what is a photo in a tangible sense?  I got sucked into this question… again… on a Photoshop and Lightroom page on Facebook recently.  You’d be surprised how many varied opinions there are about this.  Then again, knowing human nature, maybe you wouldn’t be surprised.  Some of the perspectives are quite interesting.

Some feel that a photo must be ‘pure’, SOOC (straight out of camera).  Others point out there is no such thing.  One person says there is no such thing for film, as film must still be developed and developing makes changes, but there is such a thing for digital because you can take it straight from the camera to the printer.  That’s one perspective.

Others feel that the concept is wide open and pretty much anything involving a camera is a photo.  This can include end products that are far beyond anything that is even possible in the real world.  For example, I once saw a winning photo in a national magazine photo contest with a 6,000 mile tall woman standing on top of the Earth in a James Bond-like pose.  Another perspective, and many other viewpoints in between.

Here’s my thoughts, and they are based on a simple benchmark.  The standard should be the same for film and digital, so SOOC is really irrelevant.  My base criteria is that a photo must be something that actually exists as viewed in the photo, to a reasonable extent.  That means that changing the mood or colors via dodging-and-burning with film, or Photoshop manipulation, is fine, as long as it’s “real”.  Changing the sky from blue to orange is still a representation of the sky.  The final photo must have started as a photo.

The photo contest winning “photo” I mentioned above is not, in my opinion, a photo.  Just because a camera was involved somewhere in the process does not mean the end result is still a photo.  You can call it a work of art in its own right, and it may very well be well done, but a 6,000 mile tall woman simply does not exist.  Not a photo.

The photo I include with this post IS a photo, and is pretty much SOOC.  I shot it on film in roughly 2001, developed it, scanned the slide into digital several years later, and didn’t feel the need to manipulate it beyond that.  That’s what it looked like to my eye.

Time for a change…

Big Sable Lighthouse, near Ludington, Mason County, Michigan

…but it’s only a minor change.  To give a little background, I have never been happy with the long website URL, “iowalandcapephotography”.  It’s just too long and unwieldy.  Several years ago I purchased “iowa-photo” to use on a more casual basis, and re-directed it to the longer original name.

Fast forward to today and I have switched them.  While the site is still named Iowa Landscape Photography, the official URL is “iowa-photo.com”.  If you have the website and/or the blog saved in your bookmarks you will need to update them.

Now let’s get down to the serious business… photography.  This photo was taken on Missy’s and my honeymoon seven years ago.  There’s a bit of a hike through a state park to get here, but it’s worth the walk.  We went later in the day hoping to get some good shots with the sun setting over Lake Michigan.  There was no stunning sunset, but we still got some good shots with the clouds and various foregrounds and background.

I like the perspective in this one.  It’s something you won’t normally see.  Crane the neck, look to the sky, and you can see the clouds sweeping by.  It also provides a close-up of the structure of the lighthouse itself, the steel plates bolted together.  All lighthouses are unique and this one is no different.  The color scheme of most major lighthouses are also unique to aid mariners in keeping their bearings and location.

At the end of our shoot we had to hike back.  We didn’t get back until well after dark.  Our motel was a short drive away, and our biggest challenge was yet to come… finding a place that delivered pizzas at 10:30 pm on a Sunday night.